Newsreel XIII (Mexican Revolution)

from The 42nd Parallel by John Dos Passos (1930)

 
from Chicago Tribune (Feb. 10, 1913)
 
Bedlam in Art Advertised
 
Newsreel XIII (42nd Parallel) lns. 10-12
 
Found Only Sordidness

Newsreel XIII

(lines 1-3)

        I was in front of the national palace when the firing began. I ran across the plaza with other thousands of scurrying men women and children scores of whom fell in their flight to cover

from Chicago Tribune (February 10, 1913)

The article, submitted by an anonymous embedded reporter from the Philadelphia Inquirer, was syndicated in newspapers throughout the country. 

(line 4)

NEW HIGH MOUNTAINS FOUND

[unknown]

(lines 5-7)

Oh Jim O'Shea was cast away upon an Indian Isle

The natives there they like his hair

The like his Irish smile

from Midnight Sons (1909)

Originally recorded by Blanche Ring, it was a #1 US Billboard hit for both Ring and Ada Jones in 1909, and charted for Billy Murray the next year as well. 

(line 8)

BEDLAM IN ART

from Chicago Sunday Tribune (February 16, 1913)

The phrase comes from advertisements that ran earlier in the week in papers throughout the region, presumably advertising this column by C. S. Maddocks.

 

(line 9)

BANDITS AT HOME IN WILDS

[unknown]

(lines 10-12)

     Washington considers unfortunate illogical and unnatural the selection of General Huerta as provisional president of Mexico in succession to the overthrown president

from Chicago Tribune (February 19, 1913)

A mild rephrasing of reporting by John Callan O'Laughlin on the Taft administrations official response to what they feared were "a never ending series of revolution and counter revolution."

(line 13)

3 FLEE CITY FEAR WEB

[unknown]

(line 14-15)

     He'd put sand in the hotel sugar writer says he came to America an exile and found only sordidness

from Chicago Tribune (February 22, 1913)

An amalgamation of two headlines: the first, on the front page, precedes an article about Walter M. Eggeman of the Industrial Workers of the World organizing sabotage and strike among hotel employees, the second, on pg. 3, about the suicide of Count Francis von Detling.